Search:
Menopause Live - IMS Updates
InFocus

Date of release: 09 September, 2013 (Septiembre 9, 2013)

Endometrial cancer and adipokines


Endometrial cancer is the most prevalent type of female genital tract malignancy in the developed countries. It represents nearly 50% of all new genital cancers in the Western world, surpassing the incidence of cervical cancer. Endometrial cancer is a disease of postmenopausal women (median age 63 years) and 90% of cases occur in patients over 50 years of age. Clinical risk factors include early onset of menstruation, obesity, sedentarism, nulliparity, infertility, late menopause, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, estrogen exposure and prolonged tamoxifen treatment. Some 5% of endometrial cancers are associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal carcinoma (Lynch syndrome type II). There are different subtypes of endometrial cancer but the most common is the endometrioid type (90% of cases). Other subtypes are papillary, serous, clear cell carcinoma and carcinosarcomas. Endometrioid cancer has a good prognosis, while the other subtypes are associated with a bad prognosis.


 


Abdominal obesity is a well-established risk factor for endometrial cancer, but mechanisms underlying the association are unclear. Luhn and colleagues [1] recently reported the influences of serum estradiol, adiponectin, leptin and visfatin on endometrial cancer risk in a nested case–control sample of postmenopausal women included in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. The studied population included 167 incident endometrial cancer cases and 327 matched controls with similar sociodemographic characteristics. Estradiol and adipokine (adiponectin, leptin and visfatin) levels were categorized into tertiles (T). Conditional logistic regression showed inverse association between adiponectin levels (T3 vs. T1) for the risk of endometrial cancer (odds ratio (OR) 0.48; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.29–0.80), while high leptin levels had a positive association (OR 2.77; 95% CI 1.60–4.79). The associations were stronger when considering only women not using menopause hormone therapy. There were non-significant associations between serum visfatin levels and endometrial cancer risk.

Cáncer de endometrio y adipoquinas

En los países desarrollados el cáncer de endometrio es el tumor maligno más prevalente en el tracto genital femenino; representa casi el 50% de los cánceres genitales, superando la incidencia de cáncer de cérvix. Se trata de una enfermedad de mujeres postmenopáusicas (edad mediana 63 años) y el 90% de los casos se diagnostican a partir de los 50 años de edad. Los factores de riesgo incluyen menarquía precoz, obesidad, sedentarismo, nuliparidad, esterilidad, menopausia tardía, diabetes, hipertensión, y tratamientos prolongados con estrógenos o tamoxifeno. Un 5% de los cánceres endometriales se asocian con carcinoma colorrectal hereditario no asociado a poliposis (síndrome de Lynch tipo II). Hay diferentes tipos histológicos de cáncer endometrial aunque el más frecuente es el tipo endometrioide (90%). Otros subtipos son los carcinomas papilares, serosos, de células claras y carcinosarcomas. Mientras que el carcinoma endometrioide tiene buen pronóstico, los otros subtipos lo tienen malo. La obesidad abdominal es un factor de riesgo claramente asociado con el cáncer de endometrio, pero los mecanismos implicados no están suficientemente definidos. Luhn y colaboradores [1] han publicado recientemente las influencias de los niveles séricos de estradiol, adiponectina, leptina y visfatina sobre el riesgo de cáncer endometrial en una muestra caso-control procedente de la población estudiada en el Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. La población estudiada incluyó 167 cánceres de endometrio incidentales y 327 controles apropiados con similares características sociodemográficas. Los niveles de estradiol y adipoquinas (adiponectina, leptina y visfatina) se clasificaron por terciles (T). La regresión logística condicional demostró una asociación inversa entre niveles de adiponectina (T3 frente a T1) para el riesgo de cáncer de endometrio (razón de probabilidad (OR) 0.48; intervalo de confianza (CI) del 95% de 0.29–0.80), mientras que los niveles elevados de leptina tuvieron una asociación positiva (OR 2.77; CI 95% 1.60–4.79). Las asociaciones fueron más probables cuando se consideraron solo mujeres que no usaron terapia hormonal de la menopausia. No se encontraron asociaciones significativas entre niveles de visfatina y riesgo de cáncer de endometrio.

Comment

Endometrial cancer is considered a hormone steroid-dependent tumor. High serum androstendione levels are associated with about three-fold increased risks in both pre- and postmenopausal women, while high sex hormone binding globulin levels are associated with lower cancer risk in postmenopausal women. Both high estrone levels and albumin-bound estradiol (the bioactive fraction) are also significant risk factors, even after adjustments for body mass index. On the contrary, high total, free, and albumin-bound estradiol do not increase endometrial cancer risk in premenopausal women [2]. These facts and the age peak of clinical presentation suggest that other metabolic and endocrine influences, aside of steroid hormones, may contribute to endometrial carcinogenesis. Different hormone steroid-dependent cancers have been related with obesity, including breast, colorectal and prostate cancers. In addition, there is increasing evidence that the adipokines adiponectin and leptin, which are directly produced in adipose tissue, impact several obesity-related cancers. 
 
The connection between obesity and cancer may be mediated by metabolic changes associated with insulin resistance and a state of chronic low-grade inflammation. Excessive body weight, abdominal obesity, hyperinsulinemia and increased secretion of insulin growth factor increase endometrial cancer risk [3,4]. The augmentation of fat mass involves a complex interaction of adipokines and cytokines. Cytokine production in obese adipose tissue creates a chronic inflammatory microenvironment that favors tumor cell motility, invasion, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition to enhance the metastatic potential of tumor cells [5].
 
Obesity, sedentarism and hyperinsulinemia are associated with low circulating levels of adiponectin – a protein hormone with insulin-sensitizing properties. Leptin and adiponectin respond to increasing adiposity in a reciprocal manner, and the plasma leptin : adiponectin ratio is a measure of insulin resistance. Adiponectin possesses strong anti-inflammatory, antiatherogenic, antiproliferative and insulin-sensitizing properties. A low adiponectin level is an independent predictor of incident type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer [6,7]. 
 
The data from Luhn and colleagues [1] concerning adiponectin and endometrial cancer confirm similar results from an European case–control study [8] including both pre- and postmenopausal women. The authors reported a stronger inverse association between adiponectin and endometrial cancer risk among obese women than among non-obese women, and also a stronger association  for post- or perimenopausal women than for premenopausal women. In this study, the association remained significant after separate adjustment for other biochemical markers such as C-peptide, sex hormone binding globulin, estrone or free testosterone.
 
Friedenreich and co-workers [4] published the results on blood leptin, adiponectin, and insulin from a large Canadian case–control study including 541 incident endometrial cancer cases and 961 frequency age-matched controls. The highest quartile of insulin and the homeostasis model assessment ratio were associated with 64% and 72% increased risks of endometrial cancer as compared with the lowest quartile, respectively. After adjustments, the highest quartile of adiponectin was associated with a 45% reduction in endometrial cancer risk. There were no associations between fasting glucose, leptin and leptin : adiponectin ratio and endometrial cancer risk.
 
Adiponectin actions are mediated by two distinct receptors which have different affinities for low and high molecular weight adiponectins. The scarce available information indicates that the expression of adiponectin receptors is similar in endometrial cancer as compared with normal endometrium [9]. If these findings are confirmed, it would suggest that the adiponectin changes contribute to endometrial carcinogenesis by insulin resistance and metabolic-related effects rather than by a direct action on their tumor cell receptors. It seems that weight and the adipose tissue endocrinology may have a relevant role in endometrial carcinogenesis and prognosis that requires further studies. In addition, obesity can make it difficult to detect abdominal tumors, to carry out appropriate tumor treatments (difficult surgery, chemotherapy dosing), and fat cells may affect tumor cell growth and spread. 
 
Caloric restriction stimulates mechanism of cell protection against aging and uncontrolled proliferation [10]. Theoretic interventions include prevention of weight gain and sedentarism in adolescence and adulthood, monitoring waist circumference to detect abdominal obesity and for risk of metabolic syndrome, and promoting moderate regular physical activity; these may be instruments to neutralize the obesity- and adipokine-related risk of endometrial cancer. Small changes in lifestyle (diet + exercise + social links) can translate to significant improvement in cancer risk and well-being. On the other hand, taking care of women in their forties and fifties, decades before the age of endometrial cancer diagnosis, to reduce obesity may be challenging and rewarding to prevent endometrial cancer (and cancer in other localizations); this has not been prospectively tested so far.
 
The identification and development of protective agents that mimic the effects of caloric restriction may be a future alternative for cancer prevention. The development of an adiponectin receptor agonist [7] may be a way to prevent and treat clinical conditions associated with hypoadinectinemia, including obesity, the metabolic syndrome and endometrial cancer.

Comentario

El cáncer de endometrio se considera un tumor dependiente de las hormonas esteroides sexuales. Los niveles elevados circulantes de androstendiona triplican el riesgo de cáncer de endometrio en mujeres pre y posmenopáusicas, mientras que los niveles elevados de globulina transportadora de hormonas sexuales se asocian con menor riesgo de cáncer de endometrio en mujeres posmenopáusicas. Tanto los niveles elevados de estrona como estradiol unido a albúmina (la fracción bioactiva) son también factores de riesgo significativos, incluso después del ajuste por índice de masa corporal. Por el contrario, los niveles aumentados de estradiol total, libre y unido a albúmina, no aumentan el riesgo de cáncer en mujeres premenopáusicas [2]. Estos datos y la edad de máxima presentación clínica de la enfermedad, sugieren que deben existir otros factores metabólicos y endocrinos – al margen de las hormonas esteroides – que contribuyen a la carcinogénesis endometrial. Diferentes cánceres dependientes de hormonas esteroides se han relacionado con la obesidad, como es el caso de los cánceres de mama, colorrectal y de próstata. Además, ha aumentado la evidencia científica que señala como las adipoquinas adiponectina y leptina producidas por el tejido adiposo pueden influir en diferentes cánceres relacionados con la obesidad. La vinculación entre obesidad y cáncer hay que buscarla en los cambios metabólicos asociados con la resistencia a la insulina y la inflamación crónica de bajo grado. Los factores de riesgo que aumentan el riesgo de cáncer de endometrio son el peso corporal excesivo, la obesidad abdominal, la hiperinsulinemia y el aumento del factor de crecimiento insulínico [3,4]. El aumento de la masa adiposa implica una interacción compleja entro adipoquinas y citoquinas. La producción de citoquinas por el tejido adiposo crea un microambiente de inflamación crónica que favorece la motilidad celular tumoral, invasión y la transición epitelial-mesenquimatosa para aumentar el potencial metastásico de las células tumorales [5]. La obesidad, el sedentarismo y la hiperinsulinemia se asocian a niveles bajos de adiponectina en sangre circulante. La leptina y la adiponectina mantienen una respuesta recíproca al aumento de adiposidad, y el cociente leptina/adiponectina es una expresión de resistencia a la insulina. La adiponectina tiene potentes efectos anti-inflamatorios, anti-aterogénicos, antiproliferativos y sensibilizantes a la insulina. Un nivel bajo de adiponectina es un factor independiente determinante de la incidencia de diabetes tipo 2, enfermedad cardiovascular y cáncer [6,7]. Los resultados de Luhn y colaboradores [1] sobre adiponectina y cáncer de endometrio confirman otros similares previos de un estudio caso-control europeo que incluía mujeres pre y posmenopáusicas. Cust y colaboradores [8] comunicaron una asociación inversa entre adiponectina y riesgo de cáncer de endometrio, más potente entre mujeres obesas que entre no-obesas; la asociación también fue más potente para mujeres peri y posmenopáusicas que para premenopáusicas. En el estudio europeo la asociación siguió siendo significativa tras el ajuste para otros marcadores bioquímicos como el péptido C, globulina transportadora de hormonas sexuales, estrona y testosterona libre. Friedenreich y colaboradores [4] publicaron los resultados de leptina, adiponectina e insulina circulantes de un estudio caso-control canadiense que incluía 541 cánceres incidentales de endometrio y 961 controles apropiados. Los cuartilos más altos de insulina y de cociente de evaluación del modelo homeostático se asociaron, respectivamente, con 64% y 72% de aumento del riesgo de cáncer de endometrio en comparación con los cuartilos más bajos. Tras los ajustes pertinentes, el cuartilo mayor de adiponectina se asoció con una reducción del 45% en el riesgo de cáncer de endometrio. No se encontraron asociaciones entre glucemia en ayunas, leptina y cociente leptina/adiponectina y riesgo de cáncer de endometrio. Las acciones de la adiponectina están mediadas por dos tipos de receptores con diferentes afinidades por las adiponectinas de bajo y alto peso molecular. La escasa información disponible indica que la expresión de receptores de adiponectina es similar en el cáncer de endometrio que en el endometrio normal [9]. Si estos datos se confirmasen, sugerirían que los efectos de la adiponectina sobre el proceso de carcinogénesis endometrial serían a través de la resistencia a la insulina y efectos metabólicos relacionados antes que a través de la acción directa sobre sus receptores en las células tumorales. Parece verosímil que la obesidad y la endocrinología del tejido adiposo pueden jugar un papel relevante en la carcinogénesis endometrial y pronóstico que merecen ser estudiados con mayor detalle. Por otra parte, la obesidad puede entorpecer la detección de tumores abdominales, complicar los tratamientos apropiados (cirugía difícil, problemas de dosificación de quimioterapia), y las células adiposas pueden favorecer el crecimiento y diseminación tumoral. La restricción calórica estimula los mecanismos de protección celular contra el envejecimiento y la proliferación incontrolada [10]. Las intervenciones teóricas posibles incluyen la prevención de la ganancia de peso y el sedentarismo en la adolescencia y madurez, vigilando el perímetro de la cintura para detectar la obesidad abdominal y el riesgo de síndrome metabólico, y la promoción de la actividad física moderada regular. Estas medidas pueden ser instrumentos para neutralizar el riesgo de cáncer de endometrio dependiente de la obesidad y las adipoquinas. Pequeños cambios en el estilo de vida (dieta + ejercicio + vínculos sociales) pueden traducirse en reducción del riesgo de cáncer y aumentar el bienestar. Por otra parte, la atención de las mujeres en la cuarentena o cincuentena, décadas antes de que se llegue al diagnóstico de cáncer endometrial, para reducir la obesidad puede constituir un reto y una recompensa en la prevención del cáncer de endometrio (y cánceres de otras localizaciones). Este planteamiento todavía no ha sido comprobado de manera prospectiva. La identificación y el desarrollo de agentes protectores que simulen los efectos de la restricción calórica pueden ser alternativas futuras para prevenir el cáncer. El desarrollo de agonistas de los receptores de adiponectina [7] puede ser un camino para prevenir y tratar las condiciones clínicas asociadas con hipoadiponectinemia como la obesidad, el síndrome metabólico y el cáncer de endometrio.

Faustino R. Pérez-López


Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Zaragoza Faculty of Medicine & Lozano Blesa University Hospital, Zaragoza, Spain



    References

  1. Luhn P, Dallal CM, Weiss JM, et al. Circulating adipokine levels and endometrial cancer risk in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2013;22:1304-12.


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23696194

  2. Potischman N, Hoover RN, Brinton LA, et al. Case-control study of endogenous steroid hormones and endometrial cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst 1996;88:1127-35.


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8757192

  3. Gunter MJ, Hoover DR, Yu H, et al. A prospective evaluation of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I as risk factors for endometrial cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2008;17:921-9.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18398032

  4. Friedenreich CM, Langley AR, Speidel TP, et al. Casecontrol study of markers of insulin resistance and endometrial cancer risk. Endocrine-Related Cancer 2012;19:78592.


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23033315

  5. Ellies LG, Johnson A, Olefsky JM. Obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance. In Dannenberg AJ, Berger NA, eds. Obesity, Inflammation and Cancer. Berlin: Springer, 2013:1-24




  6. Yadav A, Kataria MA, Saini V, Yadav A. Role of leptin and adiponectin in insulin resistance. Clin Chim Acta 2013;417:80-4.


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23266767

  7. Dalamaga M, Diakopoulos KN, Mantzoros CS. The role of adiponectin in cancer: A review of current evidence. Endocr Rev 2012; 33:547-94.


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22547160

  8. Cust AE, Allen NE, Rinaldi S, et al. Serum levels of C-peptide, IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 and endometrial cancer risk; results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Int J Cancer 2007;120:2656-64.


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17285578

  9. Moon HS, Chamberland JP, Aronis K, Tseleni-Balafouta S, Mantzoros CS. Direct role of adiponectin and adiponectin receptors in endometrial cancer: in vitro and ex vivo studies in humans. Mol Cancer Ther 2011;10:2234-43.


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21980131

  10. Chedraui P, Pérez-López FR. Nutrition and health during mid-life: searching for solutions and meeting challenges for the aging population. Climacteric 2013; 16(Suppl 1):85-95.


    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23651240


El siguiente comentario es una traducción de una contribución original en Inglés enviada a los miembros el Septiembre 9, 2013. La traducción ha sido gentilmente efectuada por el

Faustino R. Pérez-López

Cáncer de endometrio y adipoquinas

En los países desarrollados el cáncer de endometrio es el tumor maligno más prevalente en el tracto genital femenino; representa casi el 50% de los cánceres genitales, superando la incidencia de cáncer de cérvix. Se trata de una enfermedad de mujeres postmenopáusicas (edad mediana 63 años) y el 90% de los casos se diagnostican a partir de los 50 años de edad. Los factores de riesgo incluyen menarquía precoz, obesidad, sedentarismo, nuliparidad, esterilidad, menopausia tardía, diabetes, hipertensión, y tratamientos prolongados con estrógenos o tamoxifeno. Un 5% de los cánceres endometriales se asocian con carcinoma colorrectal hereditario no asociado a poliposis (síndrome de Lynch tipo II). Hay diferentes tipos histológicos de cáncer endometrial aunque el más frecuente es el tipo endometrioide (90%). Otros subtipos son los carcinomas papilares, serosos, de células claras y carcinosarcomas. Mientras que el carcinoma endometrioide tiene buen pronóstico, los otros subtipos lo tienen malo. La obesidad abdominal es un factor de riesgo claramente asociado con el cáncer de endometrio, pero los mecanismos implicados no están suficientemente definidos. Luhn y colaboradores [1] han publicado recientemente las influencias de los niveles séricos de estradiol, adiponectina, leptina y visfatina sobre el riesgo de cáncer endometrial en una muestra caso-control procedente de la población estudiada en el Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. La población estudiada incluyó 167 cánceres de endometrio incidentales y 327 controles apropiados con similares características sociodemográficas. Los niveles de estradiol y adipoquinas (adiponectina, leptina y visfatina) se clasificaron por terciles (T). La regresión logística condicional demostró una asociación inversa entre niveles de adiponectina (T3 frente a T1) para el riesgo de cáncer de endometrio (razón de probabilidad (OR) 0.48; intervalo de confianza (CI) del 95% de 0.29–0.80), mientras que los niveles elevados de leptina tuvieron una asociación positiva (OR 2.77; CI 95% 1.60–4.79). Las asociaciones fueron más probables cuando se consideraron solo mujeres que no usaron terapia hormonal de la menopausia. No se encontraron asociaciones significativas entre niveles de visfatina y riesgo de cáncer de endometrio.

Comentario

El cáncer de endometrio se considera un tumor dependiente de las hormonas esteroides sexuales. Los niveles elevados circulantes de androstendiona triplican el riesgo de cáncer de endometrio en mujeres pre y posmenopáusicas, mientras que los niveles elevados de globulina transportadora de hormonas sexuales se asocian con menor riesgo de cáncer de endometrio en mujeres posmenopáusicas. Tanto los niveles elevados de estrona como estradiol unido a albúmina (la fracción bioactiva) son también factores de riesgo significativos, incluso después del ajuste por índice de masa corporal. Por el contrario, los niveles aumentados de estradiol total, libre y unido a albúmina, no aumentan el riesgo de cáncer en mujeres premenopáusicas [2]. Estos datos y la edad de máxima presentación clínica de la enfermedad, sugieren que deben existir otros factores metabólicos y endocrinos – al margen de las hormonas esteroides – que contribuyen a la carcinogénesis endometrial. Diferentes cánceres dependientes de hormonas esteroides se han relacionado con la obesidad, como es el caso de los cánceres de mama, colorrectal y de próstata. Además, ha aumentado la evidencia científica que señala como las adipoquinas adiponectina y leptina producidas por el tejido adiposo pueden influir en diferentes cánceres relacionados con la obesidad. La vinculación entre obesidad y cáncer hay que buscarla en los cambios metabólicos asociados con la resistencia a la insulina y la inflamación crónica de bajo grado. Los factores de riesgo que aumentan el riesgo de cáncer de endometrio son el peso corporal excesivo, la obesidad abdominal, la hiperinsulinemia y el aumento del factor de crecimiento insulínico [3,4]. El aumento de la masa adiposa implica una interacción compleja entro adipoquinas y citoquinas. La producción de citoquinas por el tejido adiposo crea un microambiente de inflamación crónica que favorece la motilidad celular tumoral, invasión y la transición epitelial-mesenquimatosa para aumentar el potencial metastásico de las células tumorales [5]. La obesidad, el sedentarismo y la hiperinsulinemia se asocian a niveles bajos de adiponectina en sangre circulante. La leptina y la adiponectina mantienen una respuesta recíproca al aumento de adiposidad, y el cociente leptina/adiponectina es una expresión de resistencia a la insulina. La adiponectina tiene potentes efectos anti-inflamatorios, anti-aterogénicos, antiproliferativos y sensibilizantes a la insulina. Un nivel bajo de adiponectina es un factor independiente determinante de la incidencia de diabetes tipo 2, enfermedad cardiovascular y cáncer [6,7]. Los resultados de Luhn y colaboradores [1] sobre adiponectina y cáncer de endometrio confirman otros similares previos de un estudio caso-control europeo que incluía mujeres pre y posmenopáusicas. Cust y colaboradores [8] comunicaron una asociación inversa entre adiponectina y riesgo de cáncer de endometrio, más potente entre mujeres obesas que entre no-obesas; la asociación también fue más potente para mujeres peri y posmenopáusicas que para premenopáusicas. En el estudio europeo la asociación siguió siendo significativa tras el ajuste para otros marcadores bioquímicos como el péptido C, globulina transportadora de hormonas sexuales, estrona y testosterona libre. Friedenreich y colaboradores [4] publicaron los resultados de leptina, adiponectina e insulina circulantes de un estudio caso-control canadiense que incluía 541 cánceres incidentales de endometrio y 961 controles apropiados. Los cuartilos más altos de insulina y de cociente de evaluación del modelo homeostático se asociaron, respectivamente, con 64% y 72% de aumento del riesgo de cáncer de endometrio en comparación con los cuartilos más bajos. Tras los ajustes pertinentes, el cuartilo mayor de adiponectina se asoció con una reducción del 45% en el riesgo de cáncer de endometrio. No se encontraron asociaciones entre glucemia en ayunas, leptina y cociente leptina/adiponectina y riesgo de cáncer de endometrio. Las acciones de la adiponectina están mediadas por dos tipos de receptores con diferentes afinidades por las adiponectinas de bajo y alto peso molecular. La escasa información disponible indica que la expresión de receptores de adiponectina es similar en el cáncer de endometrio que en el endometrio normal [9]. Si estos datos se confirmasen, sugerirían que los efectos de la adiponectina sobre el proceso de carcinogénesis endometrial serían a través de la resistencia a la insulina y efectos metabólicos relacionados antes que a través de la acción directa sobre sus receptores en las células tumorales. Parece verosímil que la obesidad y la endocrinología del tejido adiposo pueden jugar un papel relevante en la carcinogénesis endometrial y pronóstico que merecen ser estudiados con mayor detalle. Por otra parte, la obesidad puede entorpecer la detección de tumores abdominales, complicar los tratamientos apropiados (cirugía difícil, problemas de dosificación de quimioterapia), y las células adiposas pueden favorecer el crecimiento y diseminación tumoral. La restricción calórica estimula los mecanismos de protección celular contra el envejecimiento y la proliferación incontrolada [10]. Las intervenciones teóricas posibles incluyen la prevención de la ganancia de peso y el sedentarismo en la adolescencia y madurez, vigilando el perímetro de la cintura para detectar la obesidad abdominal y el riesgo de síndrome metabólico, y la promoción de la actividad física moderada regular. Estas medidas pueden ser instrumentos para neutralizar el riesgo de cáncer de endometrio dependiente de la obesidad y las adipoquinas. Pequeños cambios en el estilo de vida (dieta + ejercicio + vínculos sociales) pueden traducirse en reducción del riesgo de cáncer y aumentar el bienestar. Por otra parte, la atención de las mujeres en la cuarentena o cincuentena, décadas antes de que se llegue al diagnóstico de cáncer endometrial, para reducir la obesidad puede constituir un reto y una recompensa en la prevención del cáncer de endometrio (y cánceres de otras localizaciones). Este planteamiento todavía no ha sido comprobado de manera prospectiva. La identificación y el desarrollo de agentes protectores que simulen los efectos de la restricción calórica pueden ser alternativas futuras para prevenir el cáncer. El desarrollo de agonistas de los receptores de adiponectina [7] puede ser un camino para prevenir y tratar las condiciones clínicas asociadas con hipoadiponectinemia como la obesidad, el síndrome metabólico y el cáncer de endometrio.

Faustino R. Pérez-López

Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Zaragoza Faculty of Medicine & Lozano Blesa University Hospital, Zaragoza, Spain

References

  1. Luhn P, Dallal CM, Weiss JM, et al. Circulating adipokine levels and endometrial cancer risk in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2013;22:1304-12.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23696194

  2. Potischman N, Hoover RN, Brinton LA, et al. Case-control study of endogenous steroid hormones and endometrial cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst 1996;88:1127-35.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8757192

  3. Gunter MJ, Hoover DR, Yu H, et al. A prospective evaluation of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I as risk factors for endometrial cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2008;17:921-9.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18398032

  4. Friedenreich CM, Langley AR, Speidel TP, et al. Casecontrol study of markers of insulin resistance and endometrial cancer risk. Endocrine-Related Cancer 2012;19:78592.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23033315

  5. Ellies LG, Johnson A, Olefsky JM. Obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance. In Dannenberg AJ, Berger NA, eds. Obesity, Inflammation and Cancer. Berlin: Springer, 2013:1-24
  6. Yadav A, Kataria MA, Saini V, Yadav A. Role of leptin and adiponectin in insulin resistance. Clin Chim Acta 2013;417:80-4.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23266767

  7. Dalamaga M, Diakopoulos KN, Mantzoros CS. The role of adiponectin in cancer: A review of current evidence. Endocr Rev 2012; 33:547-94.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22547160

  8. Cust AE, Allen NE, Rinaldi S, et al. Serum levels of C-peptide, IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 and endometrial cancer risk; results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Int J Cancer 2007;120:2656-64.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17285578

  9. Moon HS, Chamberland JP, Aronis K, Tseleni-Balafouta S, Mantzoros CS. Direct role of adiponectin and adiponectin receptors in endometrial cancer: in vitro and ex vivo studies in humans. Mol Cancer Ther 2011;10:2234-43.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21980131

  10. Chedraui P, Pérez-López FR. Nutrition and health during mid-life: searching for solutions and meeting challenges for the aging population. Climacteric 2013; 16(Suppl 1):85-95.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23651240

  11. Ver comentario completo »