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Menopause Live - IMS Updates
InFocus

Date of release: 28 December, 2015

2016 steps in

Dear IMS members


It has been customary that the last issue of Menopause Live every year becomes a New Year greeting note, looking at the year that has just ended and wishing the best for the year that is soon to start. This has been a rather quiet year, with no major drama in regard to midlife women's health in general, and menopause and hormone therapy in particular. It has also been a little of a quiet year for the IMS, in between the 2014 World Congress in Cancun and the next congress in Prague, September 26–October 1, 2016.


The main focus of the IMS is education, providing updated, unbiased clinical information. Years ago, the Society gave emphasis to hormonal issues, but recently it has moved to other domains of midlife women's health, including gender and aging issues, with a spotlight on disease prevention. The readers of Menopause Live have probably noticed the variety of topics discussed, trying to bring a spectrum of medical scenarios that may occur around the climacterium and beyond. Unfortunately, due to the reconstruction of the IMS website, it was shut down for several weeks, but now it is functioning again in its new format. Please visit the website, log in to the members' area and explore the various materials that it contains.


We have always reiterated that Menopause Live is "for the members, by the members". The IMS wants to receive commentaries on currently published studies or reviews or guidelines, so that your views and interpretations could be shared with all other members. Regrettably, the number of volunteers to write a short piece for Menopause Live has much decreased, which means that we will not be able to send you a weekly commentary, but rather according to real-time availability. Any help from the membership is thus welcomed, and collaboration in writing with other colleagues who are not IMS members is possible as well.


Jean and I wish you a happy New Year. Enjoy your time, your family and your clinical work.

Amos Pines